July 21, 2014

"Fuck you, Phoenix Wright.  I know that.  I am telling you that.

…you know way more than Phoenix Wright seems to be able to figure out and your job is not to show evidence to the court to prove anything, no, it’s to show evidence to Phoenix Wright in the hopes that he will start to figure out what’s going on around him. 

He is so stupid.  It’s like talking to an animal.  I hate him.”

no sir puzzle design doesn’t affect story or how we relate to player characters, nope nope nope

(from this review)

July 20, 2014

(Source: oldgamemags)

July 20, 2014
Form and its Usurpers

"We who Twitter views as ‘content creators’ now live in a world where, paradoxically, the most anti-capitalist measure we could take is to charge money for things. I believe we need to do this whenever possible. Offering your work free as in gratis might seem noble and kind to those who want to see it, but remember that giving things away ‘for free’ via services like Steam, the App Store or Twitter costs both you and your users far more in the long term than $5 would cost them right now. Don’t fall for the sales pitch. Don’t let these companies make you into a scab. Participate in Steam sales when you have to, but understand what the transaction entails.

Most importantly of all, we need to create history. Recall that Hegel models ideas as fundamentally historical: Free structures of thought whose lineage stretches all the way back into antiquity, guided forward by the recollection of past mistakes. Yet in the capitalist dystopia we are quickly coming to inhabit there are no ‘ideas’ anymore. There is no form, no content and no libre; we live in a world where ‘free’ means gratis, ‘form’ means Twitter and ‘content’ means Tweets. Recall that appropriation is what capitalists do best. The goal of appropriation is to erase history entirely: To focus solely on the eternal now, divorced from all context, leaving us no basis on which to make choices. History, by contrast, gives us the freedom to understand and to choose. If we want freedom we must create a history for ourselves rather than allowing our intrepid usurpers to bury it; we must resist appropriation by refusing to be erased. Understand that when you conduct a career via Twitter you are building a castle in the sand; Twitter is planning to discard your efforts once it’s done consuming them. Use the service insofar as you have to, but resist it however you can. Stop participating in the “ICYMI” culture that renders your work into a newspaper clipping. Your latest project does not need to exist solely as two weeks’ worth of viral bait in someone else’s ‘ecosystem’. The projects you’ve done in the past do not need to languish as half-eaten corpses somewhere in a forgotten database. Create a history for your work by interconnecting it in meaningful and permanent ways (not just in Twitter mentions). Provide paths from the new to the old. Connect it permanently to other people and ideas so that these ideas can grow. Your work is not a commodity; it’s alive. Build a home for it.”

A must-read article for anyone who makes things on the internet. It’s tough going sometimes, and long as fuck, but absolutely, absolutely, worth your time.

July 18, 2014
forestambassador:

Scaling the Sky is a game about ascension by William Felkner, Chelsea Howe, and Michael Molinari.
Play Online
Why Try It: A kind of platformer with a very playful sense of movement and few obstacles or stressors.
Author’s Notes: "We decided to close out 2013 by posting all our lingering games - here’s Scaling the Sky, a surreal little experience created for the SF Indie Game Jam."
From the forest ambassador: If you find yourself getting stuck, experiment with the different ways your character moves in clouds and water and remember that your goal is to keep moving upwards.

forestambassador:

Scaling the Sky is a game about ascension by William Felkner, Chelsea Howe, and Michael Molinari.

Play Online

Why Try It: A kind of platformer with a very playful sense of movement and few obstacles or stressors.

Author’s Notes: "We decided to close out 2013 by posting all our lingering games - here’s Scaling the Sky, a surreal little experience created for the SF Indie Game Jam."

From the forest ambassador: If you find yourself getting stuck, experiment with the different ways your character moves in clouds and water and remember that your goal is to keep moving upwards.

9:22pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZXYJCw1Lrv3sR
  
Filed under: game rec gams 
July 14, 2014
femfreq:

Take a look at this cosplay from GaymerX. These are the women from Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed that are too hard to animate. 

femfreq:

Take a look at this cosplay from GaymerX. These are the women from Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed that are too hard to animate. 

July 13, 2014
Dos And Don’ts For the Common Cold

fakescience:

Dos And Don'ts For the Common Cold

July 12, 2014
cephiedvariable:

I’ve spent the last fifteen years of my life slowly amassing a ludicrously expansive collection of inspirational instrumental music to back the epic fantasy novel that’s always being written in the back of my mind. So much so that when I sat down and decided to make a “Swashbuckling Fantasy Music” playlist, I had to split it into four parts. Here for your listening pleasure is the final part!
If you play D&D, or if you’re writing a sprawling genre saga, or if you just really, really like listening to beautiful soundtrack-style music, I made this playlist for you.

EPIC INSPIRATION FANTASY PLAYLIST ❧ ACT IV: WINTER
“I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says “Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.” ― Lewis Carroll
Sample Songs: Journey of Solitude, Moribound Tree and the Toad, Elba
[ ► LISTEN NOW! ]
FULL TRACK LIST

act i: springact ii: summeract iii: autumn
4/4

these playlists are wonderful

cephiedvariable:

I’ve spent the last fifteen years of my life slowly amassing a ludicrously expansive collection of inspirational instrumental music to back the epic fantasy novel that’s always being written in the back of my mind. So much so that when I sat down and decided to make a “Swashbuckling Fantasy Music” playlist, I had to split it into four parts. Here for your listening pleasure is the final part!

If you play D&D, or if you’re writing a sprawling genre saga, or if you just really, really like listening to beautiful soundtrack-style music, I made this playlist for you.

EPIC INSPIRATION FANTASY PLAYLIST  ACT IV: WINTER

“I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says “Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.” 
― Lewis Carroll

Sample Songs: Journey of Solitude, Moribound Tree and the Toad, Elba

► LISTEN NOW! ]

FULL TRACK LIST

act i: spring
act ii: summer
act iii: autumn

4/4

these playlists are wonderful

July 12, 2014
comicsalliance:

MOUSE GUARD’S ‘SWORDS & STRONGHOLDS’ GAME CAN BE YOURS THANKS TO KICKSTARTER
By Matt D. Wilson
If you’ve read any of writer/artist David Petersen’s Mouse Guard comics from Archaia, you may recall a handful of scenes in which the mice play a game called ‘Swords And Strongholds.’ It sounds a little bit like chess and looks a little bit like the Chinese game Go, but there are cards involved.
As it turns out, Petersen didn’t really have any rules in mind for the game when he dreamed it up for the comics, so he asked the creator of Burning Wheel and the Mouse Guard RPG, game maker Luke Crane, to come up with some. He did, Petersen designed a board, and they’ve gone to Kickstarter to get some funding for a limited run. Just a few days in, it’s already funded at $18,000, so if you contribute $30, you’re guaranteed a game.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

MOUSE GUARD’S ‘SWORDS & STRONGHOLDS’ GAME CAN BE YOURS THANKS TO KICKSTARTER

By Matt D. Wilson

If you’ve read any of writer/artist David Petersen’s Mouse Guard comics from Archaia, you may recall a handful of scenes in which the mice play a game called ‘Swords And Strongholds.’ It sounds a little bit like chess and looks a little bit like the Chinese game Go, but there are cards involved.

As it turns out, Petersen didn’t really have any rules in mind for the game when he dreamed it up for the comics, so he asked the creator of Burning Wheel and the Mouse Guard RPG, game maker Luke Crane, to come up with some. He did, Petersen designed a board, and they’ve gone to Kickstarter to get some funding for a limited run. Just a few days in, it’s already funded at $18,000, so if you contribute $30, you’re guaranteed a game.

READ MORE

(via rpg-maker-games)

July 10, 2014
thoughts on why I am unable to appreciate Mountain

ungaming:

image

"…I started hating it in all the uncritical ways I roll my eyes at when people hate a game without thinking why. It was too pretentious. I didn’t get it. It’s just some arty bullshit. My mind even flirted, briefly, with the notion that it wasn’t even really a game at all. Mountain was turning me into the kind of videogame player I hate, and I loathed it all the more for it.”

Excellent article on Mountain, vidyas, art, and formalism.

July 9, 2014
sbosma:

Polypheme and Odyssea, my combatants for Jenn Woodall’s FIGHTZINE, featuring an all-female cast of fighting game characters. These ended up being closer to Dark Souls enemies (maybe my Ornstein and Smough), but hey. 
I picture these two as invulnerable from the front and weak to the rear, with Polypheme’s shield and spear, and Odyssea’s gun keeping the player at bay. I imagine you’d get a few seconds to wail on their weaker side before being skewered on Polypheme’s flaming trident and hurled across the screen.
I knew I wanted to do a pair from the beginning, but I couldn’t really figure things out. I tried out some stuff with a tandem bow, one holding and aiming, the other drawing back the arrow, but visually it didn’t work. Things didn’t really develop until I drew Polypheme’s giant shield, and even then, it wasn’t until the shield became a face with a mouth that the pair clicks. The shield became a cyclops later, after looking at some Indian puppet masks, I think. She became Polypheme, and the other became Odyssea. The trident was a sword originally, but, Polyphemus, being the son of Poseidon, already has a link to the trident. The flaming part of the trident is a small nod to the flaming wooden stake Odysseus uses to blind the cyclops. 
I have a big reference folder full of matchlock guns from different time periods, culled from a few trips down the ol’ Google images rabbit hole, so that popped up. It seems mindlessly scanning Google images or Tumblr or whatever would just be a timesink and nothing else, but you never know. It pays off to keep track of the things you find visually stimulating, just in case.
These are two disparate examples of how I design characters — sometimes a lot of narrative choices go into the character, like in Polypheme, and sometimes it’s just a collection of interesting shapes, patterns, etc, like with Odyssea. The first is active, where I’m trying to fulfill some mental picture, the second is reactive, where I’m building the narrative after the shapes come together. They both have their merits.
I’m happy to add this piece of tonal dissonance to what is otherwise shaping up to be a very fun zine.

sbosma:

Polypheme and Odyssea, my combatants for Jenn Woodall’s FIGHTZINE, featuring an all-female cast of fighting game characters. These ended up being closer to Dark Souls enemies (maybe my Ornstein and Smough), but hey. 

I picture these two as invulnerable from the front and weak to the rear, with Polypheme’s shield and spear, and Odyssea’s gun keeping the player at bay. I imagine you’d get a few seconds to wail on their weaker side before being skewered on Polypheme’s flaming trident and hurled across the screen.

I knew I wanted to do a pair from the beginning, but I couldn’t really figure things out. I tried out some stuff with a tandem bow, one holding and aiming, the other drawing back the arrow, but visually it didn’t work. Things didn’t really develop until I drew Polypheme’s giant shield, and even then, it wasn’t until the shield became a face with a mouth that the pair clicks. The shield became a cyclops later, after looking at some Indian puppet masks, I think. She became Polypheme, and the other became Odyssea. The trident was a sword originally, but, Polyphemus, being the son of Poseidon, already has a link to the trident. The flaming part of the trident is a small nod to the flaming wooden stake Odysseus uses to blind the cyclops. 

I have a big reference folder full of matchlock guns from different time periods, culled from a few trips down the ol’ Google images rabbit hole, so that popped up. It seems mindlessly scanning Google images or Tumblr or whatever would just be a timesink and nothing else, but you never know. It pays off to keep track of the things you find visually stimulating, just in case.

These are two disparate examples of how I design characters — sometimes a lot of narrative choices go into the character, like in Polypheme, and sometimes it’s just a collection of interesting shapes, patterns, etc, like with Odyssea. The first is active, where I’m trying to fulfill some mental picture, the second is reactive, where I’m building the narrative after the shapes come together. They both have their merits.

I’m happy to add this piece of tonal dissonance to what is otherwise shaping up to be a very fun zine.

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